Futurity
a day
An investigation into bird populations on the Alaskan island of Chirikof has turned up evidence that the Arctic ground squirrel might not be an invasive species after all. When Catherine West, a research assistant professor in Boston University's archaeology department, arrived on the small island in the Gulf of Alaska, she planned to study how the island's bird population had changed over time. More specifically, West wanted to see what native Alaskans' food waste could tell her about the island's bird population, and vice versa. She started to excavate the island's middens (the trash dumps of ancient people) to see what the animal remains in there could tell her. She kept bringing up bones from birds, whales, seals, and, surprisingly, a lot of ground squirrels. It was kind of an accident, says West. We didn't know that they were going to be there.
Maidstone News
14 days
There seems to be more white squirrels about this year, with three sightings this week.
PC Pro
15 days
And there are cases when patients may question the effectiveness of new equipment. She says these are issues that caregivers need to tackle now. “The struggle, however, is two-part. On one side, practitioners arent learning about these techniques in schools and may not feel comfortable learning a new procedure. On the patient side, people may be sceptical about how a piece of equipment can be helpful to their treatment,” she says. See related The world’s most prolific national grid hackers have nothing on squirrels Peace sign selfies could hand hackers your fingerprints Barack Obama’s technology chief warned of hackers trying to disrupt elections back in 2013 “The last part is where my role comes in – educating the general public about the uses of VR therapy and the effectiveness. It’s my belief that, by using virtual reality, we can provide mental health services to more individuals by navigating around mental health stigma.
Plymouth Herald
15 days
The Event Chronicle
18 days
It has also been revealed that DARPA awarded $9.9 million to the Institute for Preclinical Studies Texas A and M University to develop a means of surviving significant blood loss. This would overcome the normal difficulties in requiring life-saving medical treatment immediately after combat injury which is known to be difficult to give during the complications and dangers encountered on the battle field. Another characteristic in development is having the soldiers genetically modified to hibernate throughout winter. There is a gene in squirrels that produces an enzyme in the pancreas which enables this ability. This gene can be taken from the squirrel and inserted into soldiers. Summary... some serious points to consider 1. It has to be remembered that wars are secretly manufactured for power, profit and political gain. So all the massive funding gone into these projects only goes into supporting false pretexts created by the powers that be for their own selfish means to an end.
West Briton
19 days
Forget chubby squirrels roaming the countryside in Cornwall, it's the fat pets at home not roaming the countryside that pet owners in the Duchy should be wary about. The PDSA vet charity is warning of a pet obesity pandemic with Cornish pets among the laziest and fattest in the UK. The vet charity is warning that deadly diets of treats, human dinners, biscuits and other no-nos, combined with a couch-potato lifestyle is putting our beloved furry companion's lives at risk. Read more:...
Daily Mail - Home
21 days
Dexter Erasmus, 21, filmed the squirrels with a friend in London's Hyde Park. The fearless squirrels climbed all over the two students, treating them just like trees.
Daily Mail - Home
21 days
Dexter Erasmus, 21, filmed the squirrels with a friend in London's Hyde Park. The fearless squirrels climbed all over the two students, treating them just like trees.
Mental Floss
21 days
Almost too cute to eat. Almost.
Daily Mail - Australia
22 days
Plymouth Herald
23 days
Mystery surrounds a number of wildlife creatures found dead and the RSPCA say it is likely they have been 'poisoned'. Bodies of foxes and squirrels have been found in both Budshead Woods and Warren Point.Ernesettle Enviroment and Preservation alerted people to the issue via its Facebook.The post warned dog walkers that there could be poison in those particular areas and to stay vigilent - not allowing dogs to eat anything while out walking until the matter is investigated further.There has...
Plymouth Herald
23 days
Mystery surrounds a number of wildlife creatures found dead and the RSPCA say it is likely they have been 'poisoned'. Bodies of foxes and squirrels have been found in both Budshead Woods and Warren Point.Ernesettle Enviroment and Preservation alerted people to the issue via its Facebook.The post warned dog walkers that there could be poison in those particular areas and to stay vigilent - not allowing dogs to eat anything while out walking until the matter is investigated further.There has...
Collective Evolution
a month
We know human animals are extremely smart. We know that, in so many ways, we rule the kingdom that is Planet Earth. We know this because we have forced, both intentionally and unintentionally, so many other species on the globe to fit into our world. But our greatest strength is also one of our biggest downfalls, as it has overshadowed our understanding and compassion for non-human life. What we can't seem to wrap our heads around, for the most part, is that other species may actually be just as clever as us, but in their own ways. As De Waal explains , It seems highly unfair to ask if a squirrel can count to ten if counting is not really what a squirrel's life is about. The squirrel is very good at retrieving nuts, though, and some birds are absolute experts .... That we can't compete with squirrels and nutcrackers on this task — I even forget where I parked my car — is irrelevant, since our species does not need this kind of memory for survival the way forest animals braving a freezing winter do, he continues.
BoingBoing
a month
Woot
a month
Hi friends! One thing you may not know about me is that I have a pet bird, so every night at my house is pretty much like this. Anyway, there's been a lot of politics in the news lately, but I don't think enough people have been covering this presidential cat. Squirrels just wanna have fun. And now for a little sad news: this will be our last-ever Live From the Internet post on our blog. But don't worry! I'll still be here bringing you cool blog posts every week, they'll just be different blog posts. Check back here next Wednesday for an exciting new feature! And thanks everyone for all the awesome submissions you've sent in during Live From the Internet's lifetime! You're all amazing!
Plymouth Herald
a month
Dog owners are being urged to be aware following fears foxes may have been poisoned at woods in Plymouth.Posted her concerns on the Plymouth (UK ) pets lost found Facebook page, Dawn Lapthorn said quite a large number of dead foxes have been found in the Ernesettle and Whitleigh Wood areas.She added: Please all dog walkers be careful when walking your dog's in these areas in case there is any food that has been laced with poison. There has been deceased squirrels...
Plymouth Herald
a month
Dog owners are being urged to be aware following fears foxes may have been poisoned at woods in Plymouth.Posted her concerns on the Plymouth (UK ) pets lost found Facebook page, Dawn Lapthorn said quite a large number of dead foxes have been found in the Ernesettle and Whitleigh Wood areas.She added: Please all dog walkers be careful when walking your dog's in these areas in case there is any food that has been laced with poison. There has been deceased squirrels...
Newsy
a month
With all the hand-wringing over cyberattacks, you might have missed that squirrels have done way more damage to the national grid. Learn more about this story at www.newsy.com/66439/ Find more videos like this at www.newsy.com Follow Newsy on Facebook: www.facebook.com/newsyvideos Follow Newsy on Twitter: www.twitter.com/newsyvideos
Wired
a month
A site that chronicles animals versus the power grid makes a good point about cyberwar hype, but an attack would still be serious business. The post Squirrels Keep Menacing the Power Grid. But at Least It's Not the Russians appeared first on WIRED .
RT
a month
BBC News - Technology
a month
PC Pro
a month
Alan Martin 14 min 48 sec ago Security Security experts have long warned that hackers could pose major risks to government infrastructure, including the national grid . And while there have been a small number of genuine attributed cyberattacks on the world’s power infrastructure, that number is far smaller than the damage done by the animal kingdom. That’s the conclusion of a talk by CrisSpaceRogueThomas, a hacker turned security researcher at Tenable. At the Shmoocon security conference last week, Thomas presented his findings in a talk entitled35 years of Cyberwar: The Squirrels Are Winning,” and the numbers do indeed speak for themselves – while verified hacking attacks are stuck in low single figures, squirrels have been responsible for 879. The CyberSquirrel1 project was launched to “counteract the ludicrousness of cyberwar claims by people at high levels in government and industry,” according to Thomas.
BoingBoing
a month
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZPv-wro-O8 Of 1700+ known acts of global power-grid sabotages, affecting some 5,000,000 people, 879 were caused by squirrels; between 0 and 1 were caused by Russia, and another 1 was caused by the USA (Stuxnet). (more)
Ars Technica
a month
Beware its furry cyber-wrath. (credit: Washington State ) WASHINGTON, DC—For years, the government and security experts have warned of the looming threat of "cyberwar" against critical infrastructure in the US and elsewhere. Predictions of cyber attacks wreaking havoc on power grids, financial systems, and other fundamental parts of nations' fabric have been foretold repeatedly over the past two decades, and each round has become more dire. The US Department of Energy declared in its Quadrennial Energy Review , just released this month, that the electrical grid in the US "faces imminent danger from a cyber attack." So far, however, the damage done by cyber attacks, both real (Stuxnet's destruction of Iranian uranium enrichment centrifuges and a few brief power outages alleged to have been caused by Russian hackers using BlackEnergy malware) and imagined or exaggerated (the Iranian "attack" on a broken flood control dam in Rye, New York) , cannot begin to measure up to an even more significant cyber-threatsquirrels.